Saints of Somewhere

Tony Garnett, Film and Television Producer

Tony Garnett
Film and Television Producer

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"I did think - when I was young and arrogant -  that we could make a film and change the world, and of course you can’t. What it might do though is change people’s consciousness so that they care more, understand more and demand political change.
That’s what you can do."

12-07-2016

Tony Garnett is a British  film and TV legend. Together with Ken Loach he is responsible for seminal, agenda setting social drama like Cathy Come Home, Up The Junction and Kes.

Today, in his eighties, he is as relevant as ever. A reminder of how vital it is to keep telling stories, to get them out there in any way we know how - writing, painting, film making, however that might be - and connect with one another.

A famously private man, Tony Garnett shied away from the press and giving interviews, until now. He’s decided it’s time to open up, lay bare the tragedies that have beset him and write a memoir, The Day The Music Died. In part to process the devastating way his parents died within just weeks of one another when he was only five years old but also to lift the lid on the secrets of a ground breaking career.

So press play and soak up some of the wisdom that comes from this remarkable life as Tony Garnett talks about his heroes and inspirations on Saints of Somewhere.

The Day the Music Died: A Life Lived Behind the Lens
www.tonygarnett.info

Tony Garnett


Tony Garnett’s Saints

  • Uncle Fred, the milkman who became an anchor in Tony’s life following the death of both of his parents.
  • Sydney Newman, the pioneering Head of Drama  at the BBC in the 1960s who gave breaks to a string of trailblazers including Ken Loach and Dennis Potter.
  • Dr Charles Rycroft, the post Freudian psychoanalyst who counselled Tony in his fifties.
  • Colleagues: Tony’s ‘comrades’ and collaborators.

Pioneering Head of BBC Drama, Sydney Newman

Director Ken Loach